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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

5 edition of British idealism, and social explanation found in the catalog.

British idealism, and social explanation

a study in late Victorian thought

by Sandra M. Den Otter

  • 66 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford [England], New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Idealism, English.,
    • Social sciences -- Philosophy -- History -- 19th century.,
    • Political science -- Philosophy -- History -- 19th century.,
    • Great Britain -- Intellectual life -- 19th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-244) and index.

      StatementSandra M. den Otter.
      SeriesOxford historical monographs
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsB1616.I5 D46 1996
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 250 p. ;
      Number of Pages250
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL798105M
      ISBN 100198206003
      LC Control Number95034291

      Subjective idealism, a philosophy based on the premise that nothing exists except minds and spirits and their perceptions or ideas. A person experiences material things, but their existence is not independent of the perceiving mind; material things are thus mere perceptions. The reality of the. Request PDF | British Idealism and the Human Rights Culture | Despite the fact that by the end of the nineteenth century philosophically Natural Rights had been severely undermined, and that the.

        92 Chris Renwick, ‘The British debate about the identity of sociology, –’, unpublished PhD thesis, University of Leeds, ; Otter, Sandra den, British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought, Oxford: Clarendon, ; Goldman, Lawrence, ‘ Foundations of British sociology – contexts and Cited by: 8. Idealism definition: Idealism is the beliefs and behaviour of someone who has ideals and who tries to base | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

      A species of absolute idealism, British idealism was a philosophical movement that was influential in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. The leading figures in the movement were T.H. Green (–), F. H. Bradley (–), and Bernard Bosanquet (–). They were succeeded by the second generation of J. M. E. McTaggart, H. H. Joachim, . The idealist tradition in philosophy stretches from the earliest beginnings of the subject, and extends to the present. There has never been a moment in the history of philosophy when there has not existed an idealist current: for every Locke and Hume there is a Berkeley, just as for every Russell and Moore there is a Whitehead and for every contemporary philosophical naturalist there is a.


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British idealism, and social explanation by Sandra M. Den Otter Download PDF EPUB FB2

Idealism became the dominant philosophical school of thought in late 19th-century Britain. In this study, the text examines its roots in Greek and German thinking and locates it among the prevalent methodologies and theories of the period: empiricism and positivism, naturalism, evolution, and utilitarianism.

In particular, the book sets it in the context of the late 19th- and early 20th. : British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought (Oxford Historical Monographs) (): Den Otter, Sandra M.: BooksCited by: Idealism became the dominant philosophical school of thought in late nineteenth-century Britain.

In this original and stimulating study, Sandra den Otter examines its roots in Greek and German thinking and locates it among the prevalent methodologies and theories of the period: empiricism and positivism, naturalism, evolution, and utilitarianism. A subset of absolute idealism, British idealism was a philosophical movement that was influential in Britain from the mid-nineteenth century to the early twentieth century.

The leading figures in the movement were T. Green (–), F. Bradley (–), and Bernard Bosanquet (–). They were succeeded by the second generation of J. McTaggart (–), H. den Otter, Sandra M. British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought.

Oxford: Clarendon, E-mail Citation» This is a highly useful general overview of British idealism aimed at more advanced readers, with a rich analysis of British idealism and its wider context.

Nicholson, Peter. Get this from a library. British idealism, and social explanation: a study in late Victorian thought. [Sandra M Den Otter] -- "Community"--How to define and to secure it has become a topic of lively discussion.

This endeavour also struck a deep chord among Victorians encountering the urban, industrial culture that had. Book Description: The history of social policy is emerging as an area of growing interest to both students and researchers.

This topical book charts the period from the s to the present day, providing a fresh analysis of the relationship between social theory and social policy in the UK.

Book Reviews British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Sandra M. Den Historical Monographs. Edited by, Sir John Elliott et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press, Pp.

xi+ $ This volume presents a synoptic history of British Idealism, the philosophical school which dominated British philosophy from the s through to the early years of the following century.

Offering detailed examination of the origins, growth, development and decline of this School of thought, providing clear explanation of its characteristic concepts and doctrines, and paying close attention.

This book provides a comprehensive overview of the history of philosophical idealism from ancient to contemporary philosophy. The history of idealism presented by Jeremy Dunham, Iain Hamilton Grant, and Sean Watson covers ancient philosophy (Parmenides, Plato, Neoplatonism), early modern philosophy (rationalism and empiricism), German idealism, British idealism, and various versions of.

Mander is Fellow in Philosophy at Harris Manchester College, Oxford, well as numerous articles on the history of British idealism, he has written two monographs: An Introduction to Bradley’s Metaphysics () and British Idealism; a History (). Most recently, he has edited The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth-Century ().

The author begins this book with an interesting, true, but nonetheless unexpected statement, namely that 'When I started researching twenty years ago it would not have been possible to write this history of British Idealism' (p.

xvii). British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought. Sandra M. Den Otter - - Oxford University ries: British Philosophy in European Philosophy. British Idealism: A History W. Mander Offering detailed examination of the origins, growth, development, and decline of this mode of thinking, British Idealism: A History restores to its proper place this now almost wholly forgotten period of philosophical history.

British Idealism and Social Explanation: A Study in Late Victorian Thought By Sandra M. Den Otter Clarendon Press, Read preview Overview New England Transcendentalism and St.

Louis Hegelianism: Phases in the History of American Idealism By Henry A. Pochmann Carl Schurz Memorial Foundation,   British idealism largely developed from the German idealist movement—particularly such philosophers as Immanuel Kant and G.

Hegel, who were. Idealism became the dominant philosphical school of thought in late nineteenth-century Britain. In this original and stimulating study, Sandra den Otter examines its roots in Greek and German thinking and locates it among the prevalent methodologies and theories of the period: empiricism and positivism, naturalism, evolution, and utilitarianism.

British idealism was a philosophical movement that was influential in Britain during the mid to late nineteenth century and the early twentieth leading figures in the movement were T.H. Green (), F.H. Bradley (), and Bernard Bosanquet (). They were succeeded by the second generation of J.

McTaggart, H. Joachim, J. Muirhead, and G. Mure. W. Mander presents the first ever synoptic history of British Idealism, the philosophical school which dominated English-language philosophy from the s through to the early years of the following century.

Offering detailed examination of the origins, growth, development, and decline of Pages: This chapter identifies some themes in British idealism, especially those which resonate in contemporary debates, through an examination of T.H.

Green, F.H. Bradley and J.M.E. McTaggart. This book examines the legacy of philosophical idealism in twentieth century British historical and political thought. It demonstrates that the absolute idealism of the nineteenth century was radically transformed by R.G.

Collingwood, Michael Oakeshott, and Benedetto Croce.Offering detailed examination of the origins, growth, development, and decline of this mode of thinking, British Idealism: A History restores to its proper place this now almost wholly forgotten period of philosophical history.

Through clear explanation of its characteristic concepts and doctrines, and paying close attention to the published 5/5(2).Andrew Vincent provides a positive and helpful overview of Mander's recent book, British Idealism: A on Vincent's summary, it appears that Mander supports the claim that early analytic philosophers never actually "refuted" British idealism, at least in the sense of finding an argument from premises that the idealists themselves would have accepted.